Māori Party farewell a respected Māori advocate

The Māori Party is devastated by the loss of Mereiwa Broughton who passed away this week, at the age of 77.

“Whaea Mere was passionate about her heritage and culture and cherished the knowledge she learnt from her elders,” says Māori Party Co-leader, Marama Fox.

The Māori Party is devastated by the loss of Mereiwa Broughton who passed away this week, at the age of 77.

“Whaea Mere was passionate about her heritage and culture and cherished the knowledge she learnt from her elders,” says Māori Party Co-leader, Marama Fox.

MereBroughton, who affiliated to Ngāti Awa, Ngāti Kahungunu and Taranaki, was born in Hastings and was raised under the shadow of Putauaki in the Eastern Bay of Plenty.

“She was surrounded by her elders who grounded her in tikanga, te reo Māori and rongoā Māori, and eventually she went on to study and work in health as a maternity nurse,” says Māori Party Co-leader, Te Ururoa Flavell.

She later moved to Taranaki, where she married her late husband, RukaTe Rangiahuta Broughton Snr, and the couple had five children together.

Mrs Fox says they promoted Māoritanga in their community.

“They practiced what they preached.  The couple also created a reo Māori home to ensure their own children were immersed in their culture and language.  Mere also helped set up Te Herenga Waka Marae at Wellington’s Victoria University and also took on the role of kuia for some of the unions including the Tertiary Education Union,” she says.

Mere Broughton was recognised by the Hutt City Council for her contributions to education, health and justice in 1999, and was awarded the Queen’s Service Medal for community service in the 2002 HonoursList. 

“She was a remarkable woman who touched many people’s lives.  We send our love and sympathy to her whānau, her hapū and iwi.  She will always be remembered as a strong and passionate woman who championed te reo me onā tikanga,” says Te Ururoa Flavell.